August 15, 2011

St Clements Tartlets

Clementing Cakes - St. Clement's Tartlets - for St. Clements Day

By In Recipes
St. Clement – the patron saint of blacksmiths, killed in the 4th century by being thrown into the sea, tied to an anchor. November 23rd is the feast day of St. Clement. If you happen to be a blacksmith you should be parading around the countryside carrying an effigy of ‘Old Clem’ and collecting alms (‘clementing’) for the feast. Now subsumed into Guy Fawkes and Halloween celebrations apple-bobbing hailed from the St. Clements Day activities.

Clementing Cakes – St. Clement’s Tartlets – were traditionally sold at the Berkshire Clementide Sheep Fair, where sheep, one imagines were also sold.An updated post (the original was posted in November 2008) with a new photograph; showing the rustic (i.e. rough and ready i.e. I cant really do ‘dainty’) little tarts.

Recipe St Clements Tartlets

Clementing Cakes - St. Clement's Tartlets

St Clements Tartlets
Yields 12
A traditional English tart, not overly sweet, but delicious flavoured with orange and lemon
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
45 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 225g shortcrust pastry
  2. 1 orange
  3. 1 lemon
  4. 75g soften butter
  5. 2 eggs separated
  6. 75g caster sugar
  7. teaspoon vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. Line cake tins with the rolled out pastry. Cream together the butter and sugar and gradually add the egg yolks until fully mixed. Add 2 tablespoons orange juice and the rinds from the orange and lemon. Whisk the egg whites until stiff and fold into the mixture. Pour into the pastry cases and bake for 25 minutes at 180C for a fan oven.
  2. The filling puffs up magnificently during cooking but, naturally, collapses on cooling. I prefer these warm with a little vanilla ice-cream but they are good cold too.
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Saint Clement (aka Columban) whom legend has it was martyred when he was thrown into the sea with an anchor tied around his neck. Two of his followers are then said to have assembled a congregation who prayed for the recovery of his body. Miraculously  the sea parted and created a dry gap which was said to have been a league long. In this space they found a small chapel inside which was a stone tomb containing his body, beside the coffin lay the anchor which had been tied around the saints neck, the chapel had been built by the angels. In the winter of 860 a missionary diplomat named Constantine supposedly found the mortal remains of St. Clement complete with the anchor and took them back to Constantinople. From here they eventually found their way to Rome for interment in the basilica. Legendary Dartmoor

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2 Comments
  1. Fearless Kitchen November 20, 2008

    This looks great. I actually know a couple of blacksmiths, I’ll have to pass this on to them. They should know what they ought to be doing, after all 🙂

    Reply
  2. […] (23 novembre) e vendute alla fiera di pecore del Berkshire in Inghilterra (o almeno così dicono qui, dove danno anche una ricetta un po’ diversa del dolce in formato crostatine). Tradizione non […]

    Reply

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