October 5, 2012

Almond and Damson Crumble

autumn in a bowl

By In Recipes
An empty shelf in Waitrose; bare except two forlorn punnets of damsons reduced to a pound each. One was a little squashed, the other had been opened it seemed – but I shoved them in my basket for damson season is short and who knows if the store will see anymore.

It is autumn, a crumble is the only option for these little beauts; a shame that they are such buggers to de-stone. They are not going to retain their shape once cooked but care is taken in cutting them in half and removing the stone. Care taken for the first half dozen that is, after that impatients rules and they are, how shall we say, more ‘roughly’ handled. A bonus sucking the pulp and juice from the hands mind.

Delicious Almond and Damson crumble – autumn in a bowl.

Almond and Damson Crumble
Delicious Almond and Damson crumble – autumn in a bowl.
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Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
1 hr 10 min
Prep Time
30 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
1 hr 10 min
Ingredients
  1. 2 punnets damsons
  2. 2 tbsp of sugar
  3. For the Crumble
  4. 120g plain flour
  5. 85g chilled, cubed, butter
  6. 4 tbsp caster sugar
  7. 4 tbsp ground almonds
Instructions
  1. Oven to 180C. Stone the plums and mix with the sugar in a baking dish.
  2. Mix the butter with the flour until the mix is breadcrumb like. Add the sugar and the almonds. Tip over the fruit and spread to make a crust. Bake for around 40 minutes. Serve with custard.
Notes
  1. Depending on the sweetness of the fruit more or less than 2 tbsp of sugar may be added. Personally a little tartness is enjoyed to balance the rich crumble topping.
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Almond and Damson Crumble

Almond and Damson Crumble

“The name damson comes from Middle English damascene, damesene, damasin, damsin, and ultimately from the Latin (prunum) damascenum, “plum of Damascus”. One commonly stated theory is that damsons were first cultivated in antiquity in the area around the ancient city of Damascus, capital of modern-day Syria, and were introduced into England by the Romans. The historical link between the Roman-era damascenum and the north and west European damson is rather tenuous despite the adoption of the older name. The damascenum described by Roman and Greek authors of late antiquity has more of the character of a sweet dessert plum, not fitting well to the damson plum. Remnants of damsons are sometimes found during archaeological digs of ancient Roman camps across England, and they have clearly been cultivated, and consumed, for centuries. Damson stones have been found in an excavation in Hungate, York, and dated to the late period of Anglo-Saxon England. Wikipedia

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1 Comment
  1. Jeanne @ CookSister! October 6, 2012

    Oooh, I like it! Nice rustic dish, and look at the colour of those damsons…

    Reply

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